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Diane and Guilford Glazer and Lea and Allen Orwitz Teaching Fellow in Modern Hebrew

Select the year below to view each fellow.

See Also: Instructor Pariente's CV

Itsik ParienteThe Department of Religious Studies and the Fern and Manfred Steinfeld Program in Judaic Studies are delighted to welcome Itsik Pariente, 2013–2014 Diane and Guilford Glazer and Lea and Allen Orwitz Teaching Fellow in Modern Hebrew.  Instructor Pariente is currently completing his Ph.D. in Linguistics at the University of Amsterdam.  His research interests include linguistics and Hebrew language, including General Modern Hebrew and Sephardic Modern Hebrew.  He has taught courses on Hebrew language, culture, and literature. His recent publications include "Pharyngeal related non-lexical vowels in Sephardic Modern Hebrew" (Linguistics in Amsterdam, 2010); "Grammatical paradigm uniformity" (Morphology, 2012); and Pariente & Bolozky Sh., "Stress shift and trochaic structures in the nominal system of Modern Hebrew" (Lingua, under review).

See Also: Instructor Pariente's CV

Itsik ParienteThe Department of Religious Studies and the Fern and Manfred Steinfeld Program in Judaic Studies are delighted to welcome Itsik Pariente, 2013–2014 Diane and Guilford Glazer and Lea and Allen Orwitz Teaching Fellow in Modern Hebrew.  Instructor Pariente is currently completing his Ph.D. in Linguistics at the University of Amsterdam.  His research interests include linguistics and Hebrew language, including General Modern Hebrew and Sephardic Modern Hebrew.  He has taught courses on Hebrew language, culture, and literature. His recent publications include "Pharyngeal related non-lexical vowels in Sephardic Modern Hebrew" (Linguistics in Amsterdam, 2010); "Grammatical paradigm uniformity" (Morphology, 2012); and Pariente & Bolozky Sh., "Stress shift and trochaic structures in the nominal system of Modern Hebrew" (Lingua, under review).

See Also: Instructor Pariente's CV

Itsik ParienteThe Department of Religious Studies and the Fern and Manfred Steinfeld Program in Judaic Studies are delighted to welcome Itsik Pariente, 2013–2014 Diane and Guilford Glazer and Lea and Allen Orwitz Teaching Fellow in Modern Hebrew.  Instructor Pariente is currently completing his Ph.D. in Linguistics at the University of Amsterdam.  His research interests include linguistics and Hebrew language, including General Modern Hebrew and Sephardic Modern Hebrew.  He has taught courses on Hebrew language, culture, and literature. His recent publications include "Pharyngeal related non-lexical vowels in Sephardic Modern Hebrew" (Linguistics in Amsterdam, 2010); "Grammatical paradigm uniformity" (Morphology, 2012); and Pariente & Bolozky Sh., "Stress shift and trochaic structures in the nominal system of Modern Hebrew" (Lingua, under review).

See Also: Dr. Carandina's CV

Dr. Elisa CarandinaThe Department of Religious Studies and the Fern and Manfred Steinfeld Program in Judaic Studies are delighted to welcome Dr. Elisa Carandina, 2011–2012 Diane and Guilford Glazer and Lea and Allen Orwitz Teaching Fellow in Modern Hebrew. She is replacing Dr. Michela Andreatta, who accepted a position the University of Rochester in New York.

Elisa Carandina received her PhD in Hebrew Studies in 2006 from the University of Turin and from the INALCO, Paris. Her main field of interest is contemporary Hebrew literature with special focus on gender issues. She devoted her articles to the theme of motherhood in contemporary Hebrew literature and the use of myth in Hebrew literature by women writers. Dr. Carandina also has a wide translation experience with major Italian publishing houses for which she translated Israeli novels and essays. She taught for two years at L'Orientale University, Naples, as non-tenured professor of Modern Hebrew Language and Literature.

See Also: Dr. Andreatta's CV

Dr. Michela AndreattaThe Department of Religious Studies and the Fern and Manfred Steinfeld Program in Judaic Studies are delighted to welcome Dr. Michela Andreatta, 2010–2011 Diane and Guilford Glazer and Lea and Allen Orwitz Teaching Fellow in Modern Hebrew. She is replacing Dr. Marco Di Giulio, who accepted a position as Assistant Professor of Hebrew Language and Literature at Franklin and Marshall in Lancaster, PA.

Dr. Andreatta received her Ph.D. in Hebrew Studies from the University of Turin (Italy) in 2003. Her books and articles are mainly devoted to Hebrew literature, especially poetry, written in early modern Italy. She has been a Fellow at the Harvard Centre for Jewish Studies and at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and an adjunct-fellow at the Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Recently, she has been a member of the 2010 European Seminar in Advanced Jewish Studies, "Reading in Hebrew in the Early-Modern Period," at the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies. She is currently working on a book exploring the literary aspects of Hebrew epitaph writing in 16th–18th century Italy.

Dr. Marco Di GiulioSee Also: Dr. Di Giulio's CV

Marco Di Giulio has been chosen as the 2009-10 Diane and Guilford Glazer Teaching Fellow in Modern Hebrew.  Dr. Di Giulio received his Ph. D. in Hebrew Linguistics from the University of Florence in 2006, and attended graduate courses at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He has been an adjunct Professor at the University of Florence and University of Perugia (Italy), and authored articles on ancient and modern Hebrew.

His scholarly interests range from the linguistics of ancient and modern Hebrew to Israeli literature. His doctoral thesis investigated discourse markers in Biblical Hebrew in a pragmatic perspective and explored the correlation between functional markers and types of speech acts. In parallel, he has been pursuing his interest in modern Hebrew linguistics devoting much attention to the syntactic component of the language. His ongoing research concerns the ellipsis of structural elements of the sentence within a generative framework. 

While his research concentrates on Hebrew linguistics, his teaching experience has been broad and diverse, ranging from the ancient biblical period to the contemporary period, and covering a variety of topics, from history of Jewish religion and literature, to modern Hebrew language and literature. Di Giulio has also taught a variety of classes that reflect more closely on the influence of the Bible on literature and art.


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